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Thread: Leaf Springs

  1. #11
    Aspen and Volare Super Member 77rr2x4s's Avatar
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    Wow! I never seen springs do that. Talk about unsafe those things looked like they would have came out on a big bump. Glad to see you got it all done in one day. My slow azz would have taken probably two. You might want to have considered cutting the u bolts shorter then you could have used a regular deep socket. BTW, Where did you get the springs? Good job!!!

  2. #12
    Aspen and Volare Member SpeedBanana1977's Avatar
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    Thanks! I was able to do some setup stuff on Friday (getting jack stands in place; taking tires off, etc) but the main motivation to get 'er done in a day was the weather is about to turn much colder. Plus, I wanted to drive the car--which seemed like a really bad idea on the old springs.

    I thought about cutting the u-bolts shorter but the length actually helped get everything lined up. I think I'll trim them back now because they are ridiculously long. I would have liked to get everything painted too but that will have to wait for spring.

    I bought the hardware from Eaton Detroit Spring (made in the USA!). They had the original 1980 F-body wagon spring design on file. Took about a week and a half from call to delivery--probably would have been faster but it was over the Thanksgiving holiday. I bought the isolator pads and shocks from Rock Auto. Overall, I thought this would be a bit over my head but it was actually pretty straightforward. The tips from this site definitely helped.
    Last edited by SpeedBanana1977; 1 Week Ago at 11:35 PM.

  3. #13
    Aspen and Volare Super Moderator aspen79's Avatar
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    Glad to hear it wasn't TOO bad a job!

    I've seen springs do that before, many times. Usually on trucks. The spring steel fatigues and just breaks off.

    Eaton, that's where I got my springs from also, about 15 years ago. Did yours come with a round front spring eye vs the original oval. I never thought to ask when I ordered them but am glad they came with round.

    Just curious, did you get urethane isolator pads or stock rubber? (I used urethane from,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,um,,,,,,,,,,don't remember where, lol)
    1979 Aspen Sunrise 500". Bought in 1987 with 72,000 miles and a mighty E24 California emission 90hp leaning tower of power/4-speed
    1996 Dakota with a torque monster (not) 3.9L V-6 and automatic owned since 1998. Now demoted to winter duty
    2008 Ford Mustang V6, the new summer daily driver

  4. #14
    Aspen and Volare Member SpeedBanana1977's Avatar
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    When we were going through the car for the first time, a big chunk of one oval eye came off in my hand--plus the car made a really loud clunking noise when shifting into reverse. Definitely knew something was not right!

    The new springs came with round front eyes--the guy at Eaton told me that before finalizing my order, which was nice. I think they would have made them oval upon request. Seems like the round eye/smaller bushing is preferable to that huge chunk of rubber.

    I went with the Energy Suspension polyurethane isolator pads which was an easy choice because they were the only ones available via Rock Auto!.

  5. #15
    Aspen and Volare Junior Member Locomotion's Avatar
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    The oval eyes helped to soften the ride, just like the isolator pad set-up. Round eyes provide a slighter stiffer ride and more durable options, like poly or solid inserts.

  6. #16
    Aspen and Volare Super Moderator aspen79's Avatar
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    If you have "enhanced" horsepower over stock and tires with more traction, the round eye is less likely to wheel hop also. Plus, the rear axle stays more square to the chassis. The oval bushings allow the springs to move back and forth a lot more than round bushings do. Round is just better
    1979 Aspen Sunrise 500". Bought in 1987 with 72,000 miles and a mighty E24 California emission 90hp leaning tower of power/4-speed
    1996 Dakota with a torque monster (not) 3.9L V-6 and automatic owned since 1998. Now demoted to winter duty
    2008 Ford Mustang V6, the new summer daily driver

  7. #17
    Aspen and Volare Senior Member doublechaz's Avatar
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    Unless you *want* your car to ride like Cadillac Phaeton on a single car pontoon ferry floating in a flooded down mobile drydock in a storm in the North Atlantic. Then oval would be better.

  8. #18
    Aspen and Volare Super Member 77rr2x4s's Avatar
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    I may be in the minority but I actually like the stock ride of the F body. Of course it`s not good for those other things mentioned above but most of the time I drive normal and enjoy the ride.
    Last edited by 77rr2x4s; 1 Week Ago at 10:07 PM.

  9. #19
    Aspen and Volare Super Moderator aspen79's Avatar
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    As with most things, it all comes down to what the car is, what it's primary purpose is, driver preference, etc. Some swear by poly front suspension bushings, others prefer stock rubber. If the car was built for auto cross or something similar, then poly would be the way to go. Personally, for a street car I prefer rubber. Gives a little more NVH isolation at the expense of slightly less precise handling. As with every decision on a car, everything is a compromise. That's my story and I'm sticking to it
    1979 Aspen Sunrise 500". Bought in 1987 with 72,000 miles and a mighty E24 California emission 90hp leaning tower of power/4-speed
    1996 Dakota with a torque monster (not) 3.9L V-6 and automatic owned since 1998. Now demoted to winter duty
    2008 Ford Mustang V6, the new summer daily driver

  10. #20
    Aspen and Volare Super Member 77rr2x4s's Avatar
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    One thing I learned when I was a kid was that every performance mod I made it affected something else on the car. I was constantly upgrading as the power increased.

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