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Thread: Cars dad had

  1. #1
    Aspen and Volare Super Moderator aspen79's Avatar
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    Cars dad had

    Some pics of dad's cars, other than the 2012 Charger which is in the body shop right now.

    1962 Plymouth Fury, bought new.
    1968 Dodge Coronet 440, bought new.
    1962 Plymouth Valiant, bought in the mid '70's
    1974 Plymouth Gold Duster, bought in the early '80's

    The Coronet, Duster and Valiant are parts cars now, barely. The Fury is NOT a parts car but does need a ton of work, after sitting outside for years and years and years. I'd like to hang onto it since it was the car he and my mother bought right after they got married in '62 but, it might not be practical. No place to put it and chances of restoring it are slim to none. It'll take a lot of thinking to keep, sell, keep, sell..................
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    1979 Aspen Sunrise 500". Bought in 1987 with 72,000 miles and a mighty E24 California emission 90hp leaning tower of power/4-speed
    1996 Dakota with a torque monster (not) 3.9L V-6 and automatic owned since 1998. Now demoted to winter duty
    2008 Ford Mustang V6, the new summer daily driver

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    Super Moderator 77rr2x4s's Avatar
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    That`s cool. I never kept my cars. Always went from one to another until more recently. I`ll list some of the mopars I have owned and that are now gone. 66 Dodge Coronet 500, 72 Dodge Charger, 73 Dodge Charger, 76 Volare Road Runner, 78 Chrysler Lebaron, 84 Dodge 600, 84 Chrysler Laser turbo, 1992 Plymouth Acclaim, 93 Dodge Caravan, 94 Dodge Dakota, 96 Dodge Ram 1500, 97 Dodge Ram 1500, 2001 PT cruiser, 2003 Dodge Neon,
    2006 Ram 2500, 2007 PT cruiser. Only 5 of those were bought new.
    Last edited by 77rr2x4s; 10-03-2021 at 06:23 PM.

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    Aspen and Volare Administrator Rattle Trap's Avatar
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    Man that's a shame about the Coronet. I'll check with my friend John today I think he's still looking for most of that upper side trim for his 68 sedan. A matched set would sure be nice to have. I can think of a few things I'd like as well. I've been putting back pieces in anticipation of eventually getting a 68 440 2HT myself. The Fury looks like a good project car from just the few pix.
    Volare Magnet

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    Aspen and Volare Super Moderator aspen79's Avatar
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    I have a guy who wants the Coronet but,,,,,,pretty sure all he really wants from it is the rear axle but we'll see. I THINK there's a set of wheel lip moldings for it. Don't remember the condition. This car never had them but he got a set from a scrap yard Coronet waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay back when (like early '80's). Chances are there in the basement,,,,,,,,,somewhere. I do remember the rocker moldings were pretty much shot but they haven't been on the car for eons.
    1979 Aspen Sunrise 500". Bought in 1987 with 72,000 miles and a mighty E24 California emission 90hp leaning tower of power/4-speed
    1996 Dakota with a torque monster (not) 3.9L V-6 and automatic owned since 1998. Now demoted to winter duty
    2008 Ford Mustang V6, the new summer daily driver

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    Aspen and Volare Administrator Rattle Trap's Avatar
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    One of my earliest and continuing dreams that I've never given up on because it was so very early in my attractions, has always been a 68 Coronet 2dr HT, 440 trim with the 500 quarter chromes. Preference to white and blue, or all greens. John didn't know if the missing side trim was all accounted for currently, but we might also be interested in the whole car, even if we had to strap an axle in to make it rolling onto a trailer. There were a few other items he was looking for, and I would also specifically be looking for fixable front clip parts and tail for the eventual knowledge of what the need of anything that can be found in the Ohio Valley will require. Rear rails and trunk pan on any 69-70 are just the front rail and floor issues of any F-body. It is what it is. But making sure those parts live on from your car to others is the important part. It would just be a shame to take those as parts instead of that magnificently restorable 62 Fury. But that means so much more to you and really looks incredibly viable on it's own, so it's admiration would be enough. I mean really... even if that admiration only led to it sitting in your back yard growing moss, it's sentimental value is something in your family that transcends any nonsense from others about every single car needing restoration and put back on the road. Personally I consider those people an annoyance of Helenistic strangeness. Usually of high hopes no less realizable than to personally observe something returning to the earth as we ourselves age and find the same fate. So many want to save the world, and laughingly find themselves unable to even save themselves from reality. The world keeps turning regardless.
    LOL!
    PS. Don't think I didn't notice that Toro mower in the pix!
    Volare Magnet

  6. #6
    Aspen and Volare Super Moderator aspen79's Avatar
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    The Coronet had the rear frame rails, shackle brackets, hanger brackets and piece behind the bumper replaced many, many, many years ago (like mid '80's) My dad made them from 1/8" steel. True to the way he did things, you literally cannot tell them from the original. Every dimple, hole, etc was reproduced, even "spot welds:, which were really just dimples made to simulate them. In reality it's all solid welded. He was a stickler for detail, even though it was just a repair, not a restoration. The Valiant had the same thing done right after he bought it in the late '70's. The guy that is taking the Coronet lives locally, about 15 miles to the east. Plans are to get it out of it's resting place and on his trailer this weekend. What he doesn't want off the car would probably be available. He is a car guy and also an Aspen owner.

    My brother and I talked it over about the Fury and both decided it would be best for the car's sake to sell it to someone who has the time and means to restore it. Just leaving it sit in a building somewhere would be a waste, despite the sentimental attachment. As I mentioned, the chances of me ever being able to do the restoration it deserves are slim to none. I'd love to keep it, it just isn't practical. As much as it's deteriorated in the past 15 years from sitting outside 24/7/365, it would only get worse until it looked more like the Coronet, Valiant or Duster, and that would be a shame. I have a couple pics taken around 1998 or so when he was overhauling the engine and trans, and installed a '68 rear axle. The original was the old tapered axle shaft 8 3/4". The car looked 1000% better than it does now, plus it was a running, driving car. If I can get the pics scanned, I'll post and you'll see what I mean.

    There is a sentimental attachment to the Coronet also. It was bought in '68 when the decided they needed 2 cars and it was basically bought for my mother. Still remember riding home in it from the dealership and seeing the Fury following behind. One thing I also remember is how bad the paint was. Orange peel would have been an improvement. That and, the RR door leaked air at the C pillar. Sounded like the window was opened 1/8". For whatever reason, they never took it in under warranty to get it fixed.
    Despite what we like to think about Mopar, quality control was not exactly on the top of the list.
    Last edited by aspen79; 10-05-2021 at 07:47 PM.
    1979 Aspen Sunrise 500". Bought in 1987 with 72,000 miles and a mighty E24 California emission 90hp leaning tower of power/4-speed
    1996 Dakota with a torque monster (not) 3.9L V-6 and automatic owned since 1998. Now demoted to winter duty
    2008 Ford Mustang V6, the new summer daily driver

  7. #7
    Aspen and Volare Administrator Rattle Trap's Avatar
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    The rear repairs are pretty common to find on that era B-body. Spectacular that your dad invested that effort into a sedan! the first car I owned that I could put a license plate on finally was a 69 Coronet Custom 4dr sedan. Ah the memories.... But we were doing those repairs on R/T's and Super Bee's, GTX's and even a Sport Satellite in the 80's. A guy in the next town over showed me how to do it properly in stages as his 69 RR convertible that was like 1 of 3 came together from being pulled out of a nearby field row. Wow, the only thing that's crazier to think about in how roached that thing was before it became what it did, is how long ago that was! I was so young and full of energy. So eager to learn how easy structural repairs were from the older guys just as they were teaching me how to build my own <Mopar Performance> as that had just become a thing and I'd missed my shot at the Direct Connection stuff. I'm glad to know it's pieces will be used to save other cars in your area.

    Wish I could do something proper with that beautiful Fury too! But I know exactly what I'd do with it. And there's a whole lot of people around who would do otherwise. Plus, my true goal for that general bodystyle to travel many hours westward for would be to come home with a '62 Polara 500. '60 was really the only year I didn't prefer the Dodge over the Plymouth until 71, and even then I liked the 72's better. Actually, the only thing I don't like about the 60 Dodge is the grille. I just can't get past that. But man Plymouth finally got it right for me in the 70's!
    Last edited by Rattle Trap; 10-06-2021 at 04:24 PM.
    Volare Magnet

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    Aspen and Volare Super Moderator aspen79's Avatar
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    I remember dad doing body rust repairs on the Fury (it never had any structural rust) and he made a clamp type tool to put the "spot welds" on the rocker pinch weld and wheel lips. They were cosmetic only of course, but would fool anyone. That was his way. If you're going to do it, do it right and do it fully, not half way. Seems it's a like father like sons thing.

    Obviously you can tell from the pics, the body repairs were a long, long time ago. Like 40+ years long ago.
    1979 Aspen Sunrise 500". Bought in 1987 with 72,000 miles and a mighty E24 California emission 90hp leaning tower of power/4-speed
    1996 Dakota with a torque monster (not) 3.9L V-6 and automatic owned since 1998. Now demoted to winter duty
    2008 Ford Mustang V6, the new summer daily driver

  9. #9
    Aspen and Volare Administrator Rattle Trap's Avatar
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    I did the same thing back in the days of sweating braze into seams. But I got the idea to use my dad's 3/8" round blunt nose chisel and a block of 2x4 wedged behind it on top of the jack. It sorta worked out. I used to invent all sorts of things before I could afford to outfit myself with real tools. For your dad to invent his own stuff just to maintain his personal vehicles is testimony to craftsmanship. For me it was more necessary point of pride since we actually ran a bodyshop and did late model light collision, rust repair, and some restoration in the 70's and 80's. Not today's idea of restoration. Mainly cosmetically correct. But I always had ideas on how to make it more correct, or customize something too that neither the customer or my dad would notice unless I said so to make them appreciative. I got to selling the crisping of gen 3 Corvettes. Man I still hate those things to this day solely for the fact of having worked on probably 100 of those pieces of junk when they were only between 2 and 10 years old. But as the bodystyle years progressed, the lines on them got muddy in comparison to an original 68. Those guys were getting repaints every year to make it look like theirs was another new one to their neighbors and such. With careful feathering I could leave the peaks on every bodyline and make the paint inflections more noticeable in the sunlight or nightlife. By the late 70's I was almost a teenager and doing the job estimates already, and selling that for $200! For comparison, you could get the rusty fenders and quarters on your 75 Monarch or T-bird repaired and a lower body two tone with your original upper body paint buffed back to new for that same money! That's kind of funny in mentioning because the Carter era when our cars were made was a very bad time. With high inflation, joblessness, and still people were spending that money to get my work and the old man's silky smooth paint. But the funny part is that only a few years prior we had been doing whole body same color repaints with minor rust or dent repair for the same price! We went from redoing the whole freakin car to just the bottom in any color you wished, which was typically something I chose that fit the interior palette, almost overnight. And people were still always happy to get the work done. They recognized it wasn't what they could have gotten a short time ago and were bitter about that, but not toward us. Seems we're living those kinds of days again now suddenly. Well, excepting that now you'd be lucky to pay more because nobody can get anything to do anything with what you need repaired. It's all on backorder while China controls the production of necessary items, nobody wants to go to work instead of almost wishing they could, and the aforementioned buys up everything in sight. Strange to see what they've become in the time since back then when we first opened the door to them.

    But I guess that's just my typically long way of saying that I appreciate what I see in your fathers work from so long ago. Because I know all about those times and inventing our own tools and getting the jobs done.
    Volare Magnet

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    Aspen and Volare Super Moderator aspen79's Avatar
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    What was even more amazing is, he did it all with a Lincoln 225 arc welder, even the sheet metal welds. Now THAT take some practice! He did get MIG about 10 years ago but, I don't think he ever actually used it. It's sitting in the living room (of all places), no wire, no gas cylinder. Forming sheet metal was done with a ball peen hammer and various steel and wooden blocks, a bench vise, angle iron and c-clamps, pieces of different diameters of pipe, etc.... If he needed to make a specific shape, he may have also cut a wood block for a negative mold basically. Odd curves r angles? Make engineering drawings first with all the radius and angle measurements first, then make a full size drawing of it. Make a cardboard template to figure out what shape to cut the flat steel so it matches what will be needed once bent, along with any cuts needed. Then, and only then, would he get the steel out, do all the bends and curves, weld the cut seams grind the welds smooth. Once done, you'd swear it was a stamped out piece, seriously. Of course, once the piece was ready to go on the car, it always fit PERFECTLY.

    I've been finding all sorts of jigs and tools he built for a specific purpose. The bench grinder mount is engineering genius. It's made from 1/8" steel, all perfectly cut and dressed, welded with all the welds ground smooth............It's mounted on a work bench in the basement. When the bench grinder is needed, it cradles into the mount and locks itself into place. Many other things he fabricated that honestly, I'm not sure what they're for. You should see the thing to hold the back garage door open. Made of wood, mounted to the corner of the work bench and it almost looks store bought with a pivoting wooden piece that hooks over the door handle. Angle is perfect to mirror the angle of the door when it's fully open. Man I miss him.
    1979 Aspen Sunrise 500". Bought in 1987 with 72,000 miles and a mighty E24 California emission 90hp leaning tower of power/4-speed
    1996 Dakota with a torque monster (not) 3.9L V-6 and automatic owned since 1998. Now demoted to winter duty
    2008 Ford Mustang V6, the new summer daily driver

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